Casey reads All Together Dead.

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For this one, I feel like I need to bring out that wrestling announcer to grab the mic and shill, ARE YOU READY FOR VAMPIRE POLITICCCCCCS? This, the seventh book in the series, is probably my favorite, because I am THE MOST ready for vampire politics. All Together Dead features the oft-talked about vampire political summit, amongst other things, and we’re gonna be looking at a crazy amount of plot development, so strap yourselves in. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Definitely Dead.

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There is so much going on in Definitely Dead, the sixth book in the series. New characters (actually important), a new romance, new villains, weird stuff is revealed, there’s an attempted political coup, a dude gets turned into a vampire, and another dude gets turned into a cat. Let’s just get going. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Dead as a Doornail.

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In Dead as a Doornail, the fifth book in the Sookie Stackhouse series, there are a few things going on. Arson, a sniper trying to take out local members of the shapeshifter population, some private detectives investigating that murder Sookie committed, a revenge plot, and a political coup, werewolf-style. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Modern Romance.

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If you were ever curious about just how relationships were formed over the course of human history, particularly in this day and age where your phone tells you when there’s a single person nearby, you’d probably super enjoy comedian Aziz Ansari’s Modern Romance. And if you enjoy Aziz Ansari, I mean, you are definitely going to enjoy this. I should have led with that. This is why I haven’t written my own bestseller on contemporary dating. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Dead to the World.

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If you are here for the amnesia and tortured romance trope, you came to the right book. If you are here for witches, you also came to the right book. If you are here for both of those things, then why am I recapping these, you could do it for me and I could be reading something a little less bloody. Prep yourselves for all sorts of nudity and brain matter (not at the same time, thank God) in Dead to the World, the fourth book in the series. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Club Dead.

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In Club Dead, the third book in the series, Sookie finally get seriously introduced to the shapeshifting community. Unfortunately, she only does so when Vampire Bill goes missing and she has to chase him down. Plus, there’s a dance routine, a hot new man, and a dead body in the closet. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Living Dead In Dallas.

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Living Dead in Dallas, the second book in the Sookie Stackhouse series, is a hot mess of someone who ran out of story but still had to make word count. There’s a murder mystery involving an illicit sex club, which is not nearly as interesting as it sounds, there’s a maenad, which is also not as interesting as it sounds, and then a lot of vampire blah blah that take Sookie out of state and introduce a bunch of unimportant one-offs. It’s… it is a book and I read it. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Dead Until Dark.

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For 2017, I decided a decent book-related resolution was to re-read all of the books I already own, as justification for my having bought them. Inevitably this has led to a re-read of the Sookie Stackhouse series (some may know it as the True Blood books, on which the show was based) by Charlaine Harris. These go fast (admittedly I’ve read further ahead than I’ve written, so bear with me if it gets a little rough-hewn and detail-light) but it’s a fun little series, if not at times corny, horny, and just plain bizarre. So prep yourselves for some telepathy, vampires, and a murder or two, in book one, Dead Until Dark. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey reads Heartless.

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If you know me, you know I love Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. And if you know the world of YA, you know that authors love to attempt to reinvent the wheel as far as Wonderland is concerned. So many of them like to paint the land as one at war, usually over the use or abuse of magic. And the rest love to paint it as a land where madness is mandatory. And neither of them of those interpretations (taking the infamous quote “We’re all mad here” as literally as possible), really capture what I love about Wonderland, which is less sinister and more whimsical. Yet I still devour all of it, in hopes that eventually I’d find the book that understood what I was looking for on a deeper level, and would be able to articulate what I loved in a way that I cannot do here.

And I think I finally found it. Heartless, by Marissa Meyer of the The Lunar Chronicles, is a prequel to Alice’s Adventures, examining how a girl could grow to be the cruel Queen of Hearts. And what I like most about it is that it’s not set in the center of a war-torn nation, nor is the queen the stereotypical hat-askew bloodlust “mad” the way these things often paint the beloved characters. Instead, the elements we recognize are woven in seamlessly to a love story we don’t know, and the result is just a delight. Spoilers to follow…

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Casey read books in August.

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Regardless of what the title of this post claims, I have read books in months other than August! But, you know, here are the ones I’ve read in August, as I try to get back in the habit of doing these things. Standard rules apply, a quick and spoiler-free synopsis, my opinion in a paragraph or less, and a thumbs up/thumbs down vote if it is worth your time.

Driving Heat, Richard Castle

  • The possible last in the Nikki Heat series by fictional author Richard Castle (now that the Castle TV series that spawned the books has been cancelled) finds the titular character facing some large changes in her life: assuming the captaincy of her precinct, and being engaged to long-time boyfriend, journalist Jameson Rook. But then her underlings are at professional odds with one another, her fiance is hiding some secrets, and before she can have a good chat about it, her therapist gets murdered. It’s a bad time all around.
  • Weighing in: I’ve always supremely enjoyed this book series. It’s super fun, you don’t need to watch the show to follow it (but if you do, it ends up being a lot funnier as a result – big props to the ghostwriter, who one hundred percent makes it sound as though Richard Castle is writing it. Nikki is a fleshed-out character in a surprisingly expansive world and I hope the series goes on so I can find out what happens to her.
  • Worth reading, Yay or nay?: Yay.

Away with the Fairies/Murder in Montparnasse/The Castlemaine Murders/Queen of the Flowers, Kerry Greenwood

  • Books 11-14 of the Phryne Fisher mystery series (the one off which the show Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries is based) finds twenties Australian lady detective Phryne, in turn, working for a woman’s magazine, fighting her abusive ex-boyfriend from Paris, solving a decades-old murder, and searching for her kidnapped daughter.
  • Weighing in: The series can be a little up and down, depending on how much you enjoy a given mystery and/or tertiary character, but Phryne is a fantastic, nuanced character with a rich world built around her, so she’s always a fun use of your time. (She’d say that about herself, as well.)
  • Yay or nay?: Yay.

Mycroft Holmes, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

  • Did you know Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a Holmesian? And not just a casual one, he’s deep enough in the fandom that he published his own story, the origins of Sherlock’s brother Mycroft, as he travels to Trinidad to help best friend Cyrus Douglas solve a series of disappearances, and also track down his own suddenly missing fiancée, Georgiana Sutton.
  • Weighing in: This was a bit of a dense read, with a lot of time spent on a boat, but once it got going, it really got going.
  • Yay or nay?: Yay.

Night Shift, Charlaine Harris

  • The third installment of Harris’s Midnight, Texas series (which neatly blends together bits and pieces from her other varying series). The latest finds the residents of this literal crossroads town facing a supernatural evil when people keep being lured to town by an unknown force to commit suicide.
  • Weighing in: The ending to this is really, really weird.  But the rest of it is pretty fun – the characters at this point are all well enough drawn, and it’s a closely knit community, that I’m suitably invested in their drama at this point, even if it is really, really weird.
  • Yay or nay?: Yay.

All the Feels, Danika Stone

  • When the Starveil movies kill off main character Spartan at the end of the most recent film, college freshman Liv can’t handle it. She’s not a fic writer, so instead she ropes her actor best friend in, and they secretly launch a massive fan campaign to convince the studio to revive Spartan.
  • Weighing in: This book hits on the latest mini-trend in YA, which is, as authors skew a little younger, the subject material focuses more on Fandom (and internet fandom), and how it ends up being a large part of a teen girl’s life. All the Feels is not the best example I have read of this, because it ends a little too neatly, and on such a large scale, with a romance thrown in. Nothing about my or any of my friends’ teen fandom experiences ever involved a hot steampunk boyfriend with a fake British accent.
  • Yay or nay?: Nay.